Ken Shaw

Southwestern Adventist University President Ken Shaw gives Cleburne Rotarians a math lesson during its weekly luncheon on Thursday at the Cleburne Conference Center. He said math is all over the place and is used every day by everyone.

 

 

Math is everywhere and is used every day by every person, Southwestern Adventist University President Ken Shaw said during Thursday’s Cleburne Rotary Club luncheon. 

Before he came to SWAU, Shaw said he taught math to both students and teachers for about 20 years at Florida State University. 

Math is not only in school but is in nature as well, he said, including in plants and animals.

He first discussed how there’s relationships between number in sequences, including with cyclic numbers, which are integers in which cyclic permutations of digits are successive multiples of the same numbers. The most widely known is the six-digit number 142,857, he said.

The Fibonancci number is a series of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers — 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 and so on. There are many examples of this series in nature, he said, including honey bees, cauliflower, Romanesco broccoli, a cone flower, pine cones, sunflowers, conch shells and the Milky Way galaxy. 

Fibonancci — also known as Leonardo of Pisa or Leonardo Bigollo Pisano — was a European mathematician during the Middle Ages, Shaw said.   

He also discussed the Golden Ratio, which is where if two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the quantities. A good example of this is the Parthenon temple in Greece. 

 

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